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Here Are Some Of Louisville's French Connections For Bastille Day

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Our city is named for a French king, our symbol is not one, but three fleur-de-lis. We have a bust honoring the Marquis de Lafayette, and one of the town's iconic dishes (the Hot Brown) is made with French-created Mornay sauce. To be sure, the state seems to have trouble with pronouncing words such as "Versailles," but Paris isn't that far away (it's in Bourbon county, named for another line of French kings). Of course we should be celebrating Bastille Day. While many of these restaurants may be closed on Monday, others (Brasserie Provence, for example) are open and offering France-celebrating specials. In the spirit of "vive la France," Eater offers a map of French (or at least French-inspired) restaurants around Louisville.


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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Louis Le Francais

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Chef Louis Retailleau's restaurant features classic dishes such as beef Bourguignon, sweetbreads and cassoulet, and expects his staff to "think French, act French, talk French, feel French.”

La Coop: Bistro à Vins

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Chef Bobby Benjamin combines Gallic classics like steak frites and cassoulet with Southern touches such as fried green tomatoes in this quirky, eco-conscious establishment.

Gralehaus

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This funky, fashion-forward (to be) B&B serves crêpes as well as "Stillwater Classique" beer, which if not French is at least trying to be classy.

Four Sisters

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This "nest of goodness" along Frankfort Avenue serves both sweet and savory crêpes along with coffee and bánh mì.

Blue Dog Bakery & Cafe

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Bob Hancock's baguettes are quite possibly more French than most bakeries in France. His frisée salad gets high marks for Gallicism as well.

Bistro Le Relais

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The Art Deco interior of this historic Bowman Field airport terminal restaurant has a lovely retro vibe, where one may enjoy bouillabaisse, baguettes, pâté and more.

211 Clover Lane Restaurant

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The restaurant's website says it "evokes an atmosphere of the French countryside." However, Troy Schuster's menu is currently wandering more through other Europe and America (though the house salad does come with "French vinaigrette").

Henry's Place

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This self-consciously stuffy East End establishment ("Patrons who are not suitably attired [blue jeans, ball caps, etc.] will be offered space in the bar area, if available") also "pays homage" to the brigade system "originally conceived in the late 19th century by the renowned Chef de Cuisine, Auguste Escoffier." Henry's Place will gladly serve those properly dressed some pâté and "imported cheese," which may come from France.

Ghyslain at Westport Village

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This confectioner is actually from Québec, but thanks to North America's quirky colonial history that's still pretty darn French compared to these parts.

Brasserie Provence

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"Specializing in Southern French and Traditional Brasserie Cuisine," this Hurstbourne restaurant has "assiettes" of fromage and charcuterie along with steak frites, escargot and, of course, aperitifs.

Louis Le Francais

Chef Louis Retailleau's restaurant features classic dishes such as beef Bourguignon, sweetbreads and cassoulet, and expects his staff to "think French, act French, talk French, feel French.”

La Coop: Bistro à Vins

Chef Bobby Benjamin combines Gallic classics like steak frites and cassoulet with Southern touches such as fried green tomatoes in this quirky, eco-conscious establishment.

Gralehaus

This funky, fashion-forward (to be) B&B serves crêpes as well as "Stillwater Classique" beer, which if not French is at least trying to be classy.

Four Sisters

This "nest of goodness" along Frankfort Avenue serves both sweet and savory crêpes along with coffee and bánh mì.

Blue Dog Bakery & Cafe

Bob Hancock's baguettes are quite possibly more French than most bakeries in France. His frisée salad gets high marks for Gallicism as well.

Bistro Le Relais

The Art Deco interior of this historic Bowman Field airport terminal restaurant has a lovely retro vibe, where one may enjoy bouillabaisse, baguettes, pâté and more.

211 Clover Lane Restaurant

The restaurant's website says it "evokes an atmosphere of the French countryside." However, Troy Schuster's menu is currently wandering more through other Europe and America (though the house salad does come with "French vinaigrette").

Henry's Place

This self-consciously stuffy East End establishment ("Patrons who are not suitably attired [blue jeans, ball caps, etc.] will be offered space in the bar area, if available") also "pays homage" to the brigade system "originally conceived in the late 19th century by the renowned Chef de Cuisine, Auguste Escoffier." Henry's Place will gladly serve those properly dressed some pâté and "imported cheese," which may come from France.

Ghyslain at Westport Village

This confectioner is actually from Québec, but thanks to North America's quirky colonial history that's still pretty darn French compared to these parts.

Brasserie Provence

"Specializing in Southern French and Traditional Brasserie Cuisine," this Hurstbourne restaurant has "assiettes" of fromage and charcuterie along with steak frites, escargot and, of course, aperitifs.